EUROPE

10 Words and Phrases that Don’t Mean What You Think in England

Marinello - 2-2

1. Pants: If you say “pants” in England, they will assume you are referring to your underwear. Otherwise, use the word trousers to make the conversation less awkward.

2. First Floor: If you have an important meeting on the first floor of a building, you better not go to the ground floor. The first floor in England is the same as the second floor to us.

3. Cider: If someone offers you a cup of warm apple cider, it may taste a little bit stronger then you’re used to. About 7.5% more alcohol stronger.

4. Could you Adam & Eve it?: The first time I head this, I was downright confused. It simply means, “Could you believe it?”

5. Garden: Backyard. Simple enough.

6. Barney Rubble: Yes, I thought of the cartoon character also. If someone is getting into “Barney Rubble” in England, it means they are in a bit of trouble

7. Crust of Bread: If someone tells you to “use your crust of bread!” you may not be using your head…

8. Trouble and Strife: You may hear a lot of English men complaining about their “trouble and strife” or simply their “trouble.” What they are complaining about is actually their wife.

9. Quid: Using the pound in England, naturally they came up with a slang word for it; similar to how we use ‘buck’ for a dollar.

10. Pissed: If you say that you are “totally pissed!” in England, they may assume that you have had too much to drink. Not angry.

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Eric Marinello is a Junior at the University of Kentucky majoring in Finance.