AFRICA / ASIA / AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND / EUROPE / LATIN AMERICA / MIDDLE EAST

Tipping in a Foreign Country

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Tipping in other countries can be confusing at times, especially when each country tips completely different. Here are some guidelines to tipping in some countries.

Amsterdam: Tipping is not expected in Amsterdam, but if you would like to give a tip for good service round the total bill up to the nearest dollar.

Argentina: In Argentina there isn’t a fixed percentage to tipping. Argentineans generally are not generous tippers though. It is customary to leave the change if you spend a small amount. Ex. Say you buy something for eight pesos, then you would leave the two pesos left over as a tip.

Australia: Tipping is a controversial subject. Some see tipping as an unwelcome, imported custom. But because it is becoming more common, your best bet would be to tip up to 10% at restaurants if a service charge isn’t already included.

Brazil: Tipping is not common in Brazil. At restaurants it isn’t required but if you have good service leave up to 10%.

Canada: Tipping is similar to the United States, so tip between 15-20% based on quality of service.

Chile: Normally a 10% tip is already included in the bill, but if you would like to leave more, leave up to 5%.

China: Tipping is not expected in China. If you do leave a tip there may be confusion on why you are leaving money though.

Costa Rica: Tip is usually already included in the bill, but if you have good service, an extra tip will be a nice surprise.

Croatia:  If you are just buying a drink then it is customary to leave the extra change. If you are at a casual tavern or at a konoba, tip around a dollar. If you are at a nice restaurant where tips are not normally included, leave about 10-15%.

Czech Republic: At most restaurants there is already a service charge added to your bill but you still need to tip up to 15%.

Denmark: At a restaurant bills often include the tip, but if there isn’t a tip already added, leave up to 10%.

Ecuador: Usually a 10% tip is already included in the bill but in nicer restaurants, you should leave an extra 5-10% tip.

France: A 15% service charge will automatically be added to your bill because of a law that was placed. In the smaller towns of France that is usually enough, but in Paris leave an extra 10% for good service.

Germany: If the tip hasn’t already been included in your bill, leave between a 5-10% tip.

Greece: If there is a service charge already added on the bill, leave a couple of Euros on the table for the waiter and the busboy. If there isn’t a service charge, tip between 10-20%.

Hungary: If you are just buying a drink then leave the extra change from your transaction as a tip. But if you were at a restaurant you would need to leave up to 10% as a tip.

Iceland: Tipping in Iceland is not common or expected. But if you wanted to leave a little extra, round up to the next kroner on your bill.

India: The term for tipping in India is baksheesh. It is expected that you tip the porters who help you with your bags. Although it isn’t expected to tip in a restaurant, leaving 5-10% is greatly appreciated.

Ireland: If there is a service charge then you do not need to leave an extra tip, but if there isn’t a service charge tip between 10-20%.

Italy: Usually a servizio, service charge, will already be included in the bill. But if you do not see servizio then leave a tip between 5-10%. At some restaurants they will charge you a non-optional cover charge on your bill.

Japan: There is no tipping in Japan. Tipping is considered rude.

Mexico: Tipping in Mexico is similar to tipping in the United States. Tip between 15-20% of your bill. Some restaurants will already include the bill under a line called propina, which means gratuity in Spanish. If propina is already included in your bill then you do not need to add more.

Morocco: If there isn’t a service charge already added to the bill leave up to 10% as a tip.

New Zealand: Tipping is a controversial subject. Some see tipping as an unwelcome, imported custom. But because it is becoming more common, your best bet would be to tip up to 10% at restaurants if a service charge isn’t already included.

Norway: Tipping is expected in Norway, so tip between 6-10%.

Peru: At a restaurant a 10-15% tip is expected.

South Africa: At a restaurant leave between 10-15% as a tip.

South Korea: Tipping is not common whatsoever in South Korea.

Spain: Tipping is not common in Spain, especially in bars or cafeterias but in a nicer restaurant it isn’t unheard of. If you want to leave a tip, round up to the nearest Euro or tip between 5-10%.

Sweden: Tip by rounding the bill up to the nearest kroner or 5-10%.

Switzerland: At most restaurants there is a 15% service charge already added to your bill. Then you would need to leave 5-10% extra on top of the bill.

Thailand: If there is a service charge already included in the bill then you do not need to leave extra. But if a service charge isn’t already included tip 10-15% of your restaurant bill.

Turkey: At restaurants you need to leave around a 10% tip.

United Kingdom: Some restaurants already include a service charge so then you would not need to leave any extra money as a tip. If there isn’t a service charge already added leave between 12-15%.

 

By: Caitlin Banbury

Caitlin is a senior English major and Education Abroad Peer Ambassador at UK. She studied abroad in Italy for an academic year (one semester each in Rome and Florence) with the partner program API.

For more information about the program that Caitlin completed, follow this link to the program page.